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Status: Coming products


1. Product study completed

A study for each product group examines market data, technological status and other relevant issues. When the study is completed, the Commission formulates a proposal (working document) taking the findings and recommendations of the study into account.

2. Consultation Forum and first proposal

The proposal (working document) from the Commission is communicated to experts, stakeholders and Member States. These parties meet in the Eco-design Consultation Forum to discuss the proposal.

Based on the Consultation Forum and the impact assessments, the Commission formulates a draft regulation.

3. Draft Regulation

When the Commission has formulated a draft regulation, it is sent to Inter-service Consultation (which means internal consultation of the different services of the Commission.). Before it is submitted to the Eco-design Regulatory Committee it is also notified to the WTO.

4. Approved by Regulatory Committee

The draft regulation is then submitted to the Regulatory Committee, which is composed by one representative from each EU Member State.

After the proposed regulation is adopted by a majority of the Regulatory Committee, it is sent to the European Parliament and Council for scrutiny.

5. Final Regulation

The regulation is formally adopted by the Commission and published in the Official Journal of the European Union (OJ) before it enters into force.

The most likely legal form of the implementation is “regulation”, which means that it takes direct legal effect in all Member States.

Status: Coming products


1. Product study completed

A study for each product group examines market data, technological status and other relevant issues. When the study is completed, the Commission formulates a proposal (working document) taking the findings and recommendations of the study into account.

2. Consultation Forum and first proposal

The proposal (working document) from the Commission is communicated to experts, stakeholders and Member States. These parties meet in the Eco-design Consultation Forum to discuss the proposal.

Based on the Consultation Forum and the impact assessments, the Commission formulates a draft regulation.

3. Draft Regulation

When the Commission has formulated a draft regulation, it is sent to Inter-service Consultation (which means internal consultation of the different services of the Commission.). Before it is submitted to the Eco-design Regulatory Committee it is also notified to the WTO.

4. Approved by Regulatory Committee

The draft regulation is then submitted to the Regulatory Committee, which is composed by one representative from each EU Member State.

After the proposed regulation is adopted by a majority of the Regulatory Committee, it is sent to the European Parliament and Council for scrutiny.

5. Final Regulation

The regulation is formally adopted by the Commission and published in the Official Journal of the European Union (OJ) before it enters into force.

The most likely legal form of the implementation is “regulation”, which means that it takes direct legal effect in all Member States.

Last updated: 07 March 2011

Report on the potential of halogen technologies

eceee has published a report recommending two-tiered minimum performance ecodesign requirements for directional lamps. The report proposes to base the lowest acceptable level on the performance of highly efficient infrared-coated (IRC) halogen technologies.

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The report can be downloaded here (pdf)
ELC comments on the eceee report (doc)
ELC comments annexes I-II (xls)
Burgin comments (pdf)
ECOS (US report authors) response to comments (pdf)
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The report further demonstrates that no singular patent would act as a barrier to any manufacturer intending to produce IRC lamps, thus helping to alleviate such fears.

The original preparatory study on directional lighting requirements quantifies the electricity savings potential at 23.6 - 35.6 TWh electricity per year (by 2020) in the EU alone. The preparatory study, already more than two years old, recommends using infrared-coated (IRC) halogens as the benchmark technology for minimum energy performance requirements.

The new eceee-commissioned study analyses the potential of halogen incandescent technologies to contribute to energy savings through ecodesign requirements. The performance requirements and the strategies chosen to phase out inefficient technologies from the EU market are closely followed by policy makers in other regions, and the outcomes of the EU process will have an impact on the work done elsewhere in the world.

This technology has the potential to increase the minimum efficacy of directional lamps by up to four times (defined as functional lumens per watt), while still providing an affordable technology that will provide the same quality of light as existing inefficient technologies. Halogens could thus serve as a bridging technology until other more efficient technologies can take over, the report argues.

A common argument against such strict requirements is that exclusive patents would close some manufacturers out from the market. However, extensive patent research has revealed that no singular patent would act as a barrier to any manufacturer intending to produce IRC lamps.

The authors offer alternative MEPS and suggest improved EU energy labelling levels (and to some degree different labelling algorithms) for directional lamps, based generally upon the original proposals in the preparatory study in 2008. However, advances in lamp technology in the past two years make it possible to clearly define a wider range of achievable performance, and to set more stringent requirements that could save significant lighting energy for Europe.

This research was commissioned and published by eceee with funding from the European Climate Foundation, the UK's Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) and the Swedish Energy Agency

The report can be downloaded here (pdf)

 

 

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